Taken 28-Apr-12
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Dimensions600 x 900
Original file size418 KB
Image typeJPEG
Color spacesRGB
Date taken29-Apr-12 07:41
Date modified22-May-12 23:37
Shooting Conditions

Camera makeNIKON CORPORATION
Camera modelNIKON D7000
Focal length650 mm
Focal length (35mm)975 mm
Max lens aperturef/4.8
Exposure1/640 at f/5.6
FlashNot fired, compulsory mode
Exposure bias0 EV
Exposure modeAuto
Exposure prog.Aperture priority
ISO speedISO 500
Metering modeCenter-weighted average
Digital zoom1x
Black Bulbul

Black Bulbul

The Black Bulbul (Hypsipetes leucocephalus), also known as the Himalayan Black Bulbul, Asian Black Bulbul or Square-tailed Bulbul, is a member of the bulbul family of passerine birds. It is found in southern Asia from India east to southern China.

The Black Bulbul is 24–25 cm in length, with a long tail. The body plumage ranges from slate grey to shimmering black, depending on the race. The beak, legs, and feet are all red and the head has a black fluffy crest. Sexes are similar in plumage, but young birds lack the crest, have whitish underparts with a grey breast band, and have a brown tint to the upperparts. The peninsular Indian and Sri Lankan populations (H. ganeesa and H. g. humii) have no black streak behind the eye and on the ear-coverts that is present in the Himalayan populations (H. l. psaroides and H. l. nigrescens).

This bulbul is found in broad-leaved forests, cultivation and gardens mainly in hilly areas, but Himalayan populations are known to sometimes descend into the adjoining plains in winter. Black Bulbuls feed mainly on seeds and insects, and they are often seen in small groups, either roosting or flying about in search of food. They are particularly fond of berries. They are known to feed on a wide range of berries including Celtis, Rosa, Melia and Ehretia in the Himalayas. The feed on the nectar of Salmalia, Erythrina, Rhododendron and other species. They make aerial sallies for insects. They can be quite noisy, making various loud cheeping, mewing and grating calls. The Himalayan form has been reported to make a call resembling a goat kid, throwing back its neck when calling.